ARCHIVE E: FEBRUARY 2003

Monday, February 17th, 2003
"An atheist doesn't have to be someone who thinks he has a proof that there can't be a god. He only has to be someone who believes that the evidence on the God question is at a similar level to the evidence on the werewolf question." - John McCarthy

I've been reading David Burns' Feeling Good, which is a book about cognitive therapy for depressed people. Just for the record, it's very good. It had a excerpt in there from Sigmund Freud's treatise "Mourning and Melancholia", which he refutes:

The patient represents his ego to us as worthless, incapable of any achievement and morally despicable; he reproaches himself, vilifies himself and expects to be cast out and punished...It would be equally fruitless from a scientific and therapeutic point of view to contradict a patient who brings these accusations against his ego. He must surely be right in some way and be describing something that is as it seems to him to be. Indeed we must at once confirm some of his statements without reservation. He really is as lacking in interest and incapable of love and achievement as he says...He also seems to us justified in certain other self-accusations; it is merely that he has a keener eye for the truth than other people who are not melancholic. When in his heightned self-criticism he describes himself as petty, egoistic, dishonest, lacking in independence, one whose sole aim has been to hide the weaknesses of his own nature, it may be so far as we know, that he has come pretty near to understanding himself; we only wonder why a man has to be ill before he can be accessible to truth of this kind.

Burns refutes this by saying that a sense of worthlessness is merely a symptom of the depression, and usually the person's insistence of their worthlessness has no basis. I can see it both ways. I've known some dumb and inconsiderate people who had extremely high opinions of themselves - if they could've seen the truth about themselves, they probably would've been depressed. But I've also known some smart and nice people who were depressed and thought they were worthless. So, I don't know quite yet whether I agree with Freud or Burns.
&10:48PM EST

Tuesday, February 11th, 2003
"Be happy while you're living, for you're a long time dead." - Scottish proverb.

I finished Ha Jin's Waiting sometime last week. I thought the storyline was very thought-provoking and tragic. Which is my favorite storyline. :D The only thing I thought was weird was the ending. It was sort of abrupt and seemed more like the end of a chapter than the end of the entire book. It's cool, though.
Blick. I'm really starting to dislike this layout. Especially how it's all cut off on the right side. I've been wanting to get rid of that temp layout at Canary, too. Augh, I don't have the inspiration for this.
&11:49PM EST

Sunday, February 9th, 2003
"Life is wasted on the living." - Douglas Adams.

Okay, I put up my dorky little Street Fighter fanfiction up at Afterimage. What I've written of it, anyway.It's very girly, so just keep that in mind.
I wish I had some interesting stuff to say, but unfortunately, my days have been occupied with watching my sick sister, Shannon. She's got the strep. I feel sorry for her, because she looks so pathetic, and she breathes like a 60-year old smoker, but I must get out soon. :::dies of cabin fever:::
&12:04AM EST

Tuesday, February 4th, 2003
"It's never been one of my dreams to win a Grammy. I don't think the Grammys have anything to do with artistic merit." - Jeff Tweedy of Wilco.

My sister got me to do her English homework last night, and it was a bunch of AP Exam questions on a poem. I really loved it, so I thought I'd share it with you guys. I got it from this site, which has another interesting poem inspired by this one.

"An Epitaph" by Matthew Prior
Interred beneath this marble stone,
Lie sauntering Jack and idle Joan.
While rolling threescore years and one
Did round this globe their courses run,
If human things went ill or well,
If changing empires rose or fell,
The morning passed, the evening came,
And found this couple still the same.
They walked and eat, good folks what then?
Why then they walked and eat again.
They soundly slept the night away;
They did just nothing all the day;
And having buried children four,
Would not take pains to try for more.
Nor sister either had, nor brother;
They seemed just tallied for each other.
Their moral economy
Most perfectly they made agree;
Each virtue kept it proper bound.
Nor trespassed on the others ground.
Nor fame nor censure they regarded;
They neither punished nor rewarded.
He cared not what the footmen did;
Her maids she neither praised, nor chid;
So every servant took his course,
And bad at first, they all grew worse.
Slothful disorder filled his stable,
And sluttish plenty decked her table.
Their beer was strong; their wine was port;
Their meal was large; their grace was short.
They gave the poor the remnant meat,
Just when it grew not fit to eat.
They paid the church and parish rate,
And took, but read not the receipt;
For which they claimed their Sundays due,
Of slumbering in an upper pew.
No man's defects sought they to know
So never made themselves a foe.
No man's good deeds did they commend;
So never raised themselves a friend.
Nor cherished they relations poor,
That might decrease their present store;
Nor barn nor house did they repair,
That might oblige their future heir.
They neither added nor confounded;
They neither wanted nor abounded.
Each Christmas they accompts did clear,
And wound their bottom round the year.
Nor tear nor smile did they employ
At news of public grief or joy.
When bells were rung, and bonfires made,
If asked they ne'er denied their aid:
Their jug was to the ringers carried
Whoever either died or married.
Their billet at the fire was found,
Whoever was deposed, or crowned.
Nor good, nor bad, nor fools, nor wise;
They would not learn, nor could advise:
Without love, hatred, joy, or fear,
They led a kind of, as it were:
Nor wished, nor cared, nor laughed, nor cried;
And so they lived; and so they died.

By the way, did you guys read Rolling Stone's interview with Tom Morello (past member of Rage Against the Machine, current member of Audioslave) about his opposition to war in Iraq? DAMN. It was perfect.
&11:35AM EST

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